Sunday, April 12, 2009

Goedi's List

Fill in the gaps list, or, catching up:

Ah, great! Finally an opportunity to death [oops, Freudian typo: deal] with what I call my “Anna Karenina Shelf.”

Let me start with the comedic novel triumvirate I had assigned myself a while ago. I finished off Sterne’s Tristram Shandy recently. Now I still need to tackle:
1. Miguel de Cervantes – Don Quixote
2. Francois Rabelais – Gargantua and Pentagruel

Next is the a group of books inspired by a blurb (on Roy Blount jr.’s Book of Southern Humor) by Keillor, who included Blount’s book with the Bible and Shakespeare’s plays as must reads. Since the Bible and Shakespeare’s collected plays are a little too daunting and only count as two, I’m cheating, kind of:
King James Bible –
3. Genesis
4. Exodus
5. Leviticus
6. Psalms
7. Proverbs
8. Ecclesiastes
9. Song of Solomon
10. Matthew
William Shakespeare –
11. King Lear
12. As You Like It
13. Twelfth Night
14. Richard III
15. Henry V
16. Coriolanus

Now my knightly romances, beginning with what will be looming as “the Beast”:
17. Edmund Spenser – The Faerie Queene
18. Chretien de Troyes – Arthurian Romances
19. Anon. – Lancelot of the Lake

Newer comedic stuff, catching up with the classic New Yorker folk first:
20. Dorothy Parker – The Poetry and Short Stories of Dorothy Parker
21. James Thurber – Thurber Country
22. E.B. White – Letters of E.B. White
23. S.J. Perelman – Most of the Most of S.J. Perelman
24. Joseph Mitchell – Up In the Old Hotel
25. H.L. Mencken – A Mencken Chrestomathy
26. Bennett Cerf, ed. – Encyclopedia of Modern American Humor (1954)
27. Ian Frazier – Coyote v. Acme
28. Veronica Geng – Love Trouble
29. Michael J. Rosen, ed. – Mirth of a Nation
30. Ambrose Bierce – The Devil’s Dictionary
31. Mark Twain – A Tramp Abroad
32. John Kennedy Toole – A Confederacy of Dunces
33. Don Marquis – The Annotated Archie and Mehitabel
34. Florence King – Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady
35. Terry Southern – Now Dig This
36. P.G. Wodehouse – Jeeves and the Tie That Binds
37. Kingsley Amis – Lucky Jim
38. William S. Gilbert (and Sullivan) – The Mikado
39. Ibid. – The Yeomen of the Guard
40. Ibid. – The Gondoliers
41. Peter de Vries – The Vale of Laughter
42. John Cohen, ed. – The Essential Lenny Bruce
43. Jaroslav Hasek – Das Hasek Lesebuch
44. Roy Blount Jr. – About Three Bricks Shy of a Load

Now more classics, (the plays and poems are there to buy time for the Faerie Queene):
45. Leo Tolstoy – Anna Karenina [thar she blows!]
46. Herman Melville – Billy Budd
47. Philip Larkin – Collected Poems
48. Lord Byron – Don Juan
49. Heinrich Heine – Deutschland: Ein Wintermaerchen
50. Ibid. – Die Harzreise
51. Vladimir Nabokov – Lolita
52. F. Scott Fitzgerald – The Great Gatsby
53. Niccolo Machiavelli – The Prince
54. Homer – The Iliad
55. Horace – Satires and Epistles
56. St. Augustine – Confessions
57. Oscar Wilde – The Ballad of Reading Gaol
58. Oscar Wilde – De Profundis
59. Heinrich Mann – Professor Unrat
60. Thomas Mann – Der Tod in Venedig
61. Samuel Coleridge – The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
62. Friedrich Nietzsche – Jenseits von Gut und Boese
63. Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart – Briefe
64. Harry Crews – Car
65. Heinrich von Kleist – Der zerbrochene Krug
66. Berthold Brecht – Der Kaukasische Kreidekreis
67. Berthold Brecht – Mutter Courage und Ihre Kinder
68. G.E. Lessing – Emilia Galotti
69. Bernard Shaw – Pygmalion
70. Bernard Shaw – Man and Superman
71. Anon. – The Upanishads
72. Italo Calvino – The Nonexistent Knight; The Cloven Viscount
73. Ibid. – The Baron in the Trees
74. Amanda Ward – How To Be Lost
75. Richard Sheridan – The School for Scandal
76. Joseph Conrad – The Secret Sharer
77. Ibid. - Nostromo
78. David Mamet – Glengarry Glen Ross
79. Samuel Johnson – Selected Essays
80. Mark Twain – The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
81. Flannery O’Connor – A Good Man is Hard to Find
82. Charles Dickens – Great Expectations
83. Charles Dickens – Tale of Two Cities
84. Charles Dickens – A Christmas Story
85. Evelyn Waugh – Brideshead Revisited
86. John O’Hara – BUtterfield 8
87. Joan Didion – Vintage Didion
88. Oscar Wilde – Salome
89. Igor Stravinsky – An Autobiography
90. Paul Auster – Brooklyn Follies
91. Philip Roth – The Human Stain
92. Nigel Dennis – Cards of Identity
93. Odoen von Horvath – Kasimir und Karoline
94. Franz Kafka – Der Prozess
95. Raymond Chandler – Farewell, My Lovely
96. Albert Camus – Le Mythe de Sisyphe

And, finally, some I don’t actually have on my shelf yet. (Yes, the others are all on my shelves, many with a bookmark somewhere):
97. Thomas Paine – Common Sense
98. Sinclair Lewis – Babbitt
99. E.M. Forster – A Passage to India
100. Anne Frank – Tagebuch

4 comments:

Jason Gignac said...

So, are you reading Anne Frank and Franz Kafka in German?

Jen A said...

I was going to ask that too :) And Confessions of a Failed Southern Lady is HILARIOUS - I loved it!!

Alyssa said...

Serious case of bookshelf envy!

Goedi said...

Yeah, in German. Unless Anne wrote it in Dutch in which case I'll pass. The German isn't really a problem, since I was born there and finished high school there. It's the French ones that I bought in some undergrad frenzy and have never truly dealt with.